Webinar: Making the Most of Math Connections at your Museum or Historical Site

Lauren SiegelCommunity Partnerships, Events, Field Trips, History Connections, Intern Experience, Library, Making Math, Mathematical Artifacts, Museum, Nature & Science Center, Parks & Recreation, Sharing Ideas, Take and Make, Teacher Support & Training, Ways to like math, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

Elizabeth Lay, Claire Steffen and I had the opportunity to present a webinar through the Texas Historical Commission today.  We discussed ways that museums can  enhance visitor experiences with math, showed a variety of examples of math activities at museum locations and talked about our process in developing connected activities. Our Presentation Slides are here The Handout  Sign up to

Awesome Math Making Ideas from Other People – Napiers Bones

Lauren SiegelHistory Connections, Making Math, Mathematical Artifacts, Museum, Sharing Ideas, Ways to like mathLeave a Comment

Here’s an excerpt of a twitter conversation.  Day before yesterday Aida wrote to get access to some of our files and ideas.  Yesterday she made this amazing version of Napiers Bones that is in the National Archeological Museum in Madrid.  Today I’m inspired by her project and want to know more about this version and I want to see that

Women in Steam at the Thinkery

Lauren SiegelCommunity Partnerships, Events, Making Math, Museum, Take and Make, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

Women in Mathematics!  Katherine Johnson calculated trajectories, parabolic and otherwise for NASA in the 1960s.  Almost 70 years earlier Mary Boole invented curve stitching to teach the mathematical properties of parabolas to children.  We made some really great foldable parabolas to connect to the work of both these women in math.  Here’s the laser file – we cut the holes

2020 Real Places Conference!

Lauren SiegelConference Presentations, MuseumLeave a Comment

  Elizabeth Lay, our math in history expert anchored our exhibit table and Claire Steffens, Director of Experience for Pioneer Farms co-presented with MathHappens Foundation Director Lauren Siegel.  Go Team!  We had a great time. Some links and information: We learned to use laser cutters at Austins own laser coop:  MakeATX For a short and informative  explanation of Golden Calipers

See you at MoMath!

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Join us a fun Family Friday, 10 January 2020 at the National Museum of Mathematics in New York City! Pentagonal Pursuit: Solving a Century-Old Tiling Problem — Explore the many types of tessellating tiles and decorate your favorites. Take away stories, art and patterns to inspire more discovery at home. Register now to save your spot! Follow us on Instagram

HEB Free Sunday at the Texas State History Museum – November 3

Lauren SiegelEvents, MuseumLeave a Comment

We had a special treat for HEB Sunday!  Caroline Ainslie of Bubbly Math was on hand to make a geodesic dome from balloons. We had a great team for the day including Michelle Tat, Lauren Siegel, Marybeth Barnstone, Millie Barnstone, Emmie Chng, Josephine Sheng, Caroline Ainslie, Samantha Trevino and Nina Hunt~ Samantha, Emmie, Josephine, Nina and some guest MH staffers

A 119 Year Quest to Understand Tessellating, Convex, Irregular Pentagons

Michelle TatCommunity Partnerships, Conference Presentations, Library, Museum, Nature & Science Center, Parks & Recreation, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

The idea for MathHappens to work with tessellating pentagons originated from intern Jason Gorst’s suggestions for future projects on his final report. A tessellation describes an arrangement of shapes that tiles a plane with no gaps or overlaps.The challenge of finding all possible tessellating pentagons was issued in 1900 by David Hilbert at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Paris

MathHappens @ Austin Museum Day – Pioneer Farms

Josephine ShengCommunity Partnerships, History Connections, Intern Experience, Museum, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

Stick Stock (Surveyors in Texas before Annexation to the U.S.), ca. 1845, oil on canvas, 14in. x 17 in. framed, Lent by Larry Sheerin, L.2012.2.3   MathHappens is sharing ways that a mathematical device, the survey Chain measurement system invented by Edmund Gunter in the 1600s impacted Texas history as we transitioned- only sort of — from the Mexican Vara