Take and Make: Puzzle A Day

Lauren SiegelLibrary, Take and Make, Ways to like math, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

This puzzle is available to buy various places, but you can also just make your own.  We colored the wood with Bingo daubers! MH Intern Quan Nguyen worked out a number of solutions and made the CAD file for this one.  Our files are in this folder: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/10eLBgD1HvO-bEXeYqTU9bYFZzJi8Wpm1?usp=sharing in AI, SVG and Corel Formats Also you can find solutions for

Crafting Conic Sections with MTCA – Dec. 2 Math Teacher’s Circle of Austin

Lauren SiegelCommunity Partnerships, Making Math, Take and Make, Teacher Support & Training, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

Teachers enjoy models and making and they take that enthusiasm and activity back to their students.  Hosted by Professor Jennifer Austin of University of Texas at Austin, this was a particularly fun meeting.  We discussed how we make these models – see MAA Horizon Do the Math Article , tried using paper templates and slicing into playdoh.  See Take and

Holiday Art (and Math) on the Lawn at Neil-Cochran House Museum

Lauren SiegelCommunity Partnerships, Events, Intern Experience, Museum, Sponsoring Mathematics Projects, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

We love to come out to this museum!  Its side garden is home to one of our first outdoor installations, the Pythagorean Tables.  Together they represent the 3-4 -5 triangle classic, but also each table tells a math story of its own.  The 3 x 3 is a Penrose Stair, the 4 x 4 is subdivided to 8 x 8

Take and Make: Napier’s Bones Calculator

Paola GarciaCommunity Partnerships, History Connections, Library, Making Math, Math at Home, Mathematical Artifacts, Take and Make, Teacher Support & Training1 Comment

Napier’s Bones are a manually operated calculator created by John Napier in 1612. This calculator is based on Lattice Multiplication and helps math learners with multiplying large numbers by a single digit number.  Math learners! Start identifying multiplication patterns by making your own set of Napier’s Bones! Materials: Napier’s Bones Paper Template: https://tinyurl.com/rh5xdajt Writing utensil (pencil or pen) Popsicle sticks

MathHappens at Austin Nature and Science Center Museum Day 2021

Josephine ShengCommunity Partnerships, Events, History Connections, Intern Experience, Making Math, Nature & Science Center, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

This year at Austin Nature and Science Centers Museum Day, MathHappens hosted activities relating to Voronoi diagrams and Fibonacci numbers. Thank you to Austin Nature and Science Center staff for helping us prepare for this event and for everyone that came out to Museum Day! Steph Lee and Rashell Soria led the activities at our Voronoi Diagram table. Visitors got to

MathHappens at Neill-Cochran House Museum Day 2021

Josephine ShengCommunity Partnerships, Events, History Connections, Intern Experience, Making Math, Museum, Ways to like math, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

At Austin Museum Day 2021, MathHappens hosted a suite of activities at the Pythagorean theorem tables led by Naila Najiyeva, Laila Cook, Quan Nguyen, and Rashell Soria. Visitors were able to see the Pythagorean Theorem Proof and the Sum of Odd Numbers proof. At the tables, they also saw the Penrose stairs and a modern day application of it.  

Pooled Testing At Camp with STEM Santa FE

Lauren SiegelCommunity Partnerships, Events, History Connections, Making Math, Sharing Ideas, Sponsoring Mathematics Projects, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

This post is the sequence of instruction with work examples from a STEM Santa FE Camp held on January 28, 2021.  The students are 7th and 8th graders enrolled in a summer program following a year of primarily on-line instruction. Lesson Plan  History of Pooled Testing – Demo of Simple Pooling Order a Pooled Test Demo Kit (same as in

Voronoi at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum

Josephine ShengCommunity Partnerships, Intern Experience, Making Math, Parks & Recreation, Sharing Ideas, Sponsoring Mathematics Projects, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

We’ve been working closely with the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum in creating activities and models to accompany the Beehive they have on site. There are a lot a mathematical concepts that can be taught in relation to the way beehives are constructed such as tessellations, Voronoi diagrams, area, and perimeter. We can’t wait to see how they use these activities and

Wald’s Survivorship Airplane Problem

Lauren SiegelMuseum, Sharing Ideas, Ways to like math, Zoom FriendlyLeave a Comment

This is a great example where mathematicians applied some creative thinking to solve a very real world problem.  It is Abraham Wald’s Survivorship Bias problem.  To help explain the sequence of concepts that lead to his insight, we made some wooden planes to help visualize the problem, and the solution. We start out thinking about the planes that come back