Take and Make: Tabletop Optical Illusions and Perspective Playground

Lauren SiegelMaking Math, Mathematical Artifacts, Sharing Ideas, Take and Make, Ways to like math, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

We found an instructable on making chalk art patterns in CorelDraw.  But guess what? — you can use this technique to poster print all kinds of fun 3d designs.  The instructable is here.   Its pretty cool! We sent a logo perspective box, aReuleux car and some conic section models to the NWMath Conference. PDFs can be printed in various sizes.  “Chalk”

MathHappens @ Austin Museum Day!

Lauren SiegelCommunity Partnerships, Mathematical Artifacts, Media, Museum, Nature & Science Center, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

Here’s a link to an interview I did this morning with CBS Austin’s Trevor Scott.  MathHappens Foundation is an active participant in the Austin museum community.  We have learned a lot in eight years of collaborations about the way museums approach storytelling, sharing knowledge and ideas with an intent to spark interest and start conversations.  

Take and Make: Magician’s Rods

Lauren SiegelMaking Math, Mathematical Artifacts, Sharing Ideas, Take and Make, Ways to like math, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

I learned about these on a video on Numberphile. .  In the video they said the magic words “no longer available” and that was it, we had to make our own.  Josephine Sheng designed these way back in 2017 I think, and we just never posted.  We don’t like “tricking” people, but if you have a good half hour you can

Take and Make: Conic Sections Model

Lauren SiegelMaking Math, Mathematical Artifacts, Sharing Ideas, Take and Make, Ways to like math, We think math is fun!12 Comments

Turns out you can use CorelDraw to  reverse engineer the parts to a conic section model.  Read all about it in the November 2021 MAA Math Horizons page called Do The Math (p. 29). Editor Tom Edgar was fun to work with, and made the graphic images. Note:  if you are “making” this model from scratch, once you find the

Take and Make: Napier’s Bones Calculator

Paola GarciaCommunity Partnerships, History Connections, Library, Making Math, Math at Home, Mathematical Artifacts, Take and Make, Teacher Support & Training1 Comment

Napier’s Bones are a manually operated calculator created by John Napier in 1612. This calculator is based on Lattice Multiplication and helps math learners with multiplying large numbers by a single digit number.  Math learners! Start identifying multiplication patterns by making your own set of Napier’s Bones! Materials: Napier’s Bones Paper Template: https://tinyurl.com/rh5xdajt Writing utensil (pencil or pen) Popsicle sticks

New audience. Old artifacts.

J JCommunity Partnerships, Field Trips, Mathematical Artifacts, Museum, Teacher Support & TrainingLeave a Comment

If you are a fan of museums, then you have seen something like this object before… probably dozens of times.  This impressive artifact is a nocturnal from La Belle and it can be used to tell time at night by the positions of the stars. As historic artifacts and symbols of exploration and discovery, navigation tools like this one spark

Webinar: Making the Most of Math Connections at your Museum or Historical Site

Lauren SiegelCommunity Partnerships, Events, Field Trips, History Connections, Intern Experience, Library, Making Math, Mathematical Artifacts, Museum, Nature & Science Center, Parks & Recreation, Sharing Ideas, Take and Make, Teacher Support & Training, Ways to like math, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

Elizabeth Lay, Claire Steffen and I had the opportunity to present a webinar through the Texas Historical Commission today.  We discussed ways that museums can  enhance visitor experiences with math, showed a variety of examples of math activities at museum locations and talked about our process in developing connected activities. Our Presentation Slides are here The Handout  Recording Hosted by

Take and Make: Proof without Words Sum of Odd Numbers – Freese Transformation

Lauren SiegelMaking Math, Mathematical Artifacts, Sharing Ideas, Take and Make, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

This Geometric Transformation  shows how the sum of the first 6 consecutive odd numbers is the square of 6, or 36.  It’s the classic “proof without words”.  Freese’s Transformation also shows this relationship, but his “squares” have sides sqrt 1, sqrt 3, sqrt 5, and so on. Freese Corel File, Adobe Illustrator File, Jpg printable  

Take and Make: Experimental Mathematics Cucumber Edition

Lauren SiegelMaking Math, Mathematical Artifacts, Sharing Ideas, Take and Make, Ways to like math, We think math is fun!Leave a Comment

Here’s a fun one!  Inspired by a conversation with Chris Daniels of Public Math. He said roll paper around a cylinder and cut on an angle to get an ellipse and produce a sine wave.  So we did!  And you can too.  Then you can make a roller from ellipses, reflect your sine curve and roll the elliptical roller along